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editorial on history today

THERE’S PLENTY OF HISTORY IN THE MAKING AT THE NATIONAL CIVIL RIGHTS MUSEUM. 

Letter to the Community: Response to Video in the Murder of Tyre Nichols

LETTER TO THE COMMUNITY “Every man of humane convictions must decide on the protest that best suits his convictions, but we must all protest.” – Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. in his speech “Beyond Vietnam,” April 4, 1967 at Riverside Church in New York City.   Watching the horrible circumstances that resulted in Tyre Nichols’ death is hard to stomach. It’s never okay to normalize the beating of Black bodies, regardless of the... Read More
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Museum Statement on the death of Tyre Nichols

“Our lives begin to end the day we become silent about things that matter.”   – Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. The National Civil Rights Museum mourns another tragedy in the death of Tyre Nichols. We extend our deepest sympathy to his family fighting for justice in his killing. A killing while in police custody.  A traffic stop that resulted in his death. We call for justice for Tyre Nichols. We call for continued immediacy in gathering the facts and... Read More
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Museum Statement on the Passing of Dr. Charles A. Champion

We are deeply saddened by the passing of Dr. Charles A. Champion, a community pillar, pharmacist, and master compounder of Champion’s Pharmacy and Herb Store since 1981. Our deepest condolences to the Champion Family.  The Champion Family’s ties are intertwined with the Museum through the Lorraine Motel’s history. In 1958, Dr. Champion married Carolyn Bailey, the daughter of the Lorraine’s owners, Walter and Loree Bailey, at the motel. From 2016-2020, the... Read More
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Museum Statement Regarding the Passing of Bill Russell

The National Civil Rights Museum mourns the passing of 2011 Freedom Award honoree and sports pioneer, William Felton Russell. Following baseball legend Jackie Robinson’s example, Bill Russell believed it was his responsibility as a celebrity to use his platform to stand up for positive social change. Bill Russell was an outspoken advocate for civil rights. He was one of the first celebrities to proudly call himself “Black,” when “Negro" was still the accepted... Read More
at Sunday, July 31, 2022
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Museum Launches Corporate Equity Center with AutoZone Support

The National Civil Rights Museum (NCRM) announces its launch of the Corporate Equity Center. The NCRM’s Corporate Equity Center will provide programs to learn, discuss, and reflect on how inequities filter into decisions that are barriers to Black advancement in corporations and other workplace settings. AutoZone has provided many resources and contributed $5 million seed funding to launch the Corporate Equity Center. “We are very fortunate to have a longstanding partnership... Read More
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Museum Statement Regarding the Passing of Sidney Poitier

The National Civil Rights Museum joins the world in grieving the loss of a great icon and its 2001 Freedom Award honoree, Mr. Sidney Poitier. Poitier was a trailblazing thespian and staunch civil rights activist that remained true to his principles.  His art reflected his convictions.  Because of that, the world reimagined Black culture during a transformative period that challenged racial prejudice and social norms. On stage, screen, and in real life, Poitier reflected a... Read More
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Museum Statement on the Passing of Archbishop Desmond Tutu

The National Civil Rights Museum grieves the loss of world leader and 1992 Freedom Award honoree, Archbishop Desmond Tutu. Tutu became the first black Anglican Dean of Johannesburg in 1975, Bishop of Johannesburg in 1985, and Archbishop of Cape Town in 1986. Under his vigorous leadership, the church in South Africa became immersed in the political struggle. He was chosen by President Mandela to chair South Africa's Truth and Reconciliation Commission (TRC) to investigate the crimes... Read More
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Museum Statement on the Passing of Secretary Colin Powell

The National Civil Rights Museum expresses deep sorrow in the passing of 1997 Freedom Award honoree, Secretary Colin L. Powell. Secretary Powell was appointed by President George W. Bush as the 65th Secretary of State in 2000, becoming the first African American Secretary of State in the U.S.  Powell was a professional soldier for 35 years, during which time he held a myriad of command and staff positions and rose to the rank of four-star general.  His last assignment, from... Read More
at Monday, October 18, 2021
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Museum Statement on the Passing of Bob Moses

The National Civil Rights Museum mourns the passing of civil rights icon Bob Moses, a visionary leader, innovative educator and champion for voting rights.  Moses received the museum’s Freedom Award in 2014. Bob Moses was born Robert Parrish Moses in Harlem, NY.  He understood that access to the ballot for the most underserved required educating the electorate, not only to mitigate obstacles to voting, but also to provide opportunity for economic advancement.  As a... Read More
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Museum Selects Russell Wigginton as New President

The National Civil Rights Museum has named Dr. Russell Wigginton as the museum’s next president.  Wigginton will begin his new position on August 1. He brings 29 years of experience in education, philanthropy, executive management and program development, as well as strategic planning and partnership building. Museum Board Chairman Herb Hilliard stated, “We are fortunate to be able to attract someone of Russ’s background and experience to serve as our next President.... Read More
at Thursday, July 1, 2021
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