National Civil Rights Museum News

There’s plenty of history in the making here at the National Civil Rights Museum.

More #StolenLives

MORE #STOLENLIVES When will it be enough? by Terri Lee Freeman President, National Civil Rights Museum In the span of 24 hours America was shaken by the report of two mass shootings resulting in the deaths of 31 people – 22 killed at a WalMart in El Paso, TX and 9 killed in Dayton, OH in an entertainment district.  Not unlike most everyone who breathes fresh air, my heart grieves for every family that said good-bye to their loved ones, not expecting it would be so... Read More
Posted by Connie Dyson
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Museum Receives Top Honor

The National Civil Rights Museum is among 10 institutions the Institute of Museum and Library Services announced today as recipients of the 2019  National Medal for Museum and Library Service s , the nation’s highest honor given to libraries and museums that make significant and exceptional contributions to their communities. Over the past 25 years, the award has celebrated institutions that are making a difference for individuals, families, and communities. Selected from 30... Read More
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VOTER SUPPRESSION IS VOTER SUPPRESSION

Voter Suppression IS Voter Suppression By Terri Lee Freeman, National Civil Rights Museum President Lyndon Baines Johnson signed into law the Voting Rights Acts of 1965 with the intent of eliminating the legal barriers imposed at the state and local levels to prevent African Americans from exercising their legal right to vote as stated in the 15th Amendment.  That amendment was ratified in 1870 and it guaranteed voting rights to all men regardless of race.  It’s... Read More
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Museum Mourns the Passing of Freedom Award Honoree Frank Robinson

We are saddened by the passing of baseball icon Frank Robinson, a Hall of Famer, two-time MVP, and MLB’s first African-American manager. He was honored by the National Civil Rights Museum with the Freedom Award Lifetime Achievement Award in 2014. His contributions to civil rights and baseball were many, including the integration of black players in the league. While he was with us for the Freedom Award, he spoke often about the impact his mentor Jackie Robinson, who broke Major League... Read More
Posted by Connie Dyson at Thursday, February 7, 2019
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America Has a Hate Problem

By Terri Lee Freeman, Museum President Our issues of hate are killing our country… still.  Last fall, we witnessed NBC Today Show host Megyn Kelly state, “…when I was a kid that [using blackface] was okay if you were dressing up as a character.”  Uh…no, Ms. Kelly, it wasn’t okay then, and it isn’t okay now.  And now, the Governor of the Commonwealth of Virginia’s racist exploits, either as Michael Jackson in... Read More
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Let’s stop tearing down community and build something we can all be proud of

By Terri Lee Freeman In early October the National Civil Rights Museum, along with Bridges and Facing History and Ourselves, launched a campaign to encourage empathy. Our  Open Up. Spark a Connection.  campaign was created to get people to do just what it says,  open up !   In the face of our national discourse, or possibly the lack thereof, being empathetic and recognizing the “others” as ourselves couldn’t be more important. ... Read More
at Monday, November 5, 2018
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How are the Children?

I often think of a customary greeting in some African countries, ‘How are the Children?”  The response is generally, “The children are well.”  The question is asked because child well-being is a good measure of community well-being.  Regrettably, we cannot provide that response. By all measures the children are not at all well.  The policy to separate children from parents who illegally cross the border, emphasizes just how poorly the children are,... Read More
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Thank You!

By Terri Lee Freeman Museum President A little over a month ago, we were singularly focused on MLK50.  Not just the commemoration itself, but for the National Civil Rights Museum, each individual event.  We worked to ensure that people were where they needed to be, that programs were rich in content and scope, that the speakers, panelists, civil rights icons and new movement makers were in place to share their stories and perspectives, that the logistics, technology, broadcasts... Read More
at Wednesday, May 9, 2018
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In Memoriam - Art Shay

By Dr. Noelle N. Trent,  Director of Interpretation, Collections & Education  Nearly one month after his 96th birthday, April 28,  Chicago-based, Bronx-born photographer Art Shay passed away.  The name Art Shay may be unfamiliar, but his work is prominently featured in the museum’s newest exhibition  MLK50: A Legacy Remembered .  I first became acquainted with Shay’s work, when his archivist Erica called me, and asked... Read More
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Museum Statement on the Passing of Hugh Masekela and Wyatt Tee Walker

  January 23, 2018 will go down in civil rights history as a sad day.  Two of the icons of the 20th century civil rights movement made their transition – Ramapolo Hugh Masekela and Rev. Wyatt Tee Walker. Hugh Masekela was a renowned South African composer.  In a career spanning more than five decades, Masekela gained international recognition with his distinctive Afro-Jazz sound and hits such as “Soweto Blues”, which served as one of the soundtracks... Read More
Posted by Connie Dyson at Wednesday, January 24, 2018
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