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There’s plenty of history in the making here at the National Civil Rights Museum.

Category: National Civil Rights Museum

Bayard Rustin: Strategist, Organizer, Unifier

As he approached the podium, Bayard Rustin was determined and elated. He expected about 100,000 marchers to converge at the Washington Monument on August 28, 1963. To his delight, approximately 250,000 people cheered as he listed the demands of the march. The March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom began after eight weeks of recruiting marchers, coordinating buses and marshals, scheduling speakers, and managing logistics. Despite Rustin’s critical role as the march’s chief... Read More
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The Revolution Will Not Be Televised

The National Civil Rights Museum Celebrates Black Music Month Music has been intrinsically linked with the Civil Rights Movement and African American history. Our celebration of Black Music Month began as a way to connect with you during this pandemic. However, as the current moment has unfolded, it has become a way for us to use music to educate, heal, reflect, and inspire. Each week, we will release a themed playlist curated by the NCRM staff. Share with us your recommendations using... Read More
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The Very Real Pain of Racism

By Terri Lee Freeman, Museum President I have always looked at the glass as half full as opposed to empty.  But even so, I consider myself more of a pragmatist than an optimist.  As an African American woman, I’ve experienced how ugly the world can be.  I’ve experienced both blatant and more insidious racism.  I’ve been called a nigger. I’ve been assumed to be the assistant to my white CFO when, in fact, I was the CEO.  I’ve watched... Read More
at Thursday, May 28, 2020
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Black America Gets Pneumonia

From Black Enterprise , May 24, 2020 by Terri Lee Freeman Just as 9/11 defined the new millennium, the novel coronavirus will certainly be the story of the decade.  The global pandemic has caused a devastating public health crisis, initiated a global economic disaster, and in the United States, pulled back the curtain on the  deep-rooted racial inequities  that persist. Just as COVID-19 is a deadly virus, so is the disease of racism, particularly systemic racism.... Read More
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We Were Prepared to Die: Freedom Riders

Fifty-nine years ago, the Freedom Rides of 1961 entered the state of Alabama. Potential violence awaited in Anniston and Birmingham. Below, the backstory of how the Freedom Rides began and how one of the most pivotal protests in the Civil Rights Movement came about. While we know the names of notable activists like James Lawson and Diane Nash, there are numerous overlooked details behind the scenes of this epic event. The Freedom Riders story began fifteen years earlier in 1946 when... Read More
at Thursday, May 14, 2020
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400 Years Later. The Historical Truth.

Sometime around August 20, 1619 (the exact date is not known), a ship arrived on the shores of Point Comfort, Virginia with between 20 and 30 Africans…and thus the Inter-Atlantic theft and enslavement of African people began. Thanks to the 1619 Project, an initiative of the New York Times , spearheaded by Nikole Hannah Jones, a staff writer for New York Times Magazine and a 2017 MacArthur Fellow, we have accurate information being openly discussed in the media about the true... Read More
at Tuesday, September 24, 2019
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More #StolenLives

MORE #STOLENLIVES When will it be enough? by Terri Lee Freeman President, National Civil Rights Museum In the span of 24 hours America was shaken by the report of two mass shootings resulting in the deaths of 31 people – 22 killed at a WalMart in El Paso, TX and 9 killed in Dayton, OH in an entertainment district.  Not unlike most everyone who breathes fresh air, my heart grieves for every family that said good-bye to their loved ones, not expecting it would be so... Read More
Posted by Connie Dyson
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Museum Receives Top Honor

The National Civil Rights Museum is among 10 institutions the Institute of Museum and Library Services announced today as recipients of the 2019  National Medal for Museum and Library Service s , the nation’s highest honor given to libraries and museums that make significant and exceptional contributions to their communities. Over the past 25 years, the award has celebrated institutions that are making a difference for individuals, families, and communities. Selected from 30... Read More
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VOTER SUPPRESSION IS VOTER SUPPRESSION

Voter Suppression IS Voter Suppression By Terri Lee Freeman, National Civil Rights Museum President Lyndon Baines Johnson signed into law the Voting Rights Acts of 1965 with the intent of eliminating the legal barriers imposed at the state and local levels to prevent African Americans from exercising their legal right to vote as stated in the 15th Amendment.  That amendment was ratified in 1870 and it guaranteed voting rights to all men regardless of race.  It’s... Read More
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Let’s stop tearing down community and build something we can all be proud of

By Terri Lee Freeman In early October the National Civil Rights Museum, along with Bridges and Facing History and Ourselves, launched a campaign to encourage empathy. Our  Open Up. Spark a Connection.  campaign was created to get people to do just what it says,  open up !   In the face of our national discourse, or possibly the lack thereof, being empathetic and recognizing the “others” as ourselves couldn’t be more important. ... Read More
at Monday, November 5, 2018
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