National Civil Rights Museum News

There’s plenty of history in the making here at the National Civil Rights Museum.

Category: News

Missing the Olympics

By Terri Lee Freeman Museum President It’s been little more than a week since the closing ceremony of one of the most memorable Olympic competitions in history.  The United States secured its largest number of medals ever in a non-boycotted Olympics.  The Rio Olympics saw a number of firsts – the first refugee team, the first African American woman to medal in an individual swimming event (gold no less!), the first American female to win gold in wrestling, Ibtihaj... Read More
Posted by Connie Dyson at Thursday, September 1, 2016

#StolenLives – More shootings? What's going on?

Commentary by Terri Lee Freeman President, National Civil Rights Museum Three mornings this week we’ve awakened to news of horrific violence. Three incidents. Seven people dead. Two dead from police violence. Five dead from retaliation.  36 hours. Senseless.  My heart grieves for every family that has suddenly lost a loved one.  My heart grieves for our nation.   We are living in perilous times.  Times where individuals have become emboldened in their... Read More

A Humanitarian, A Gentle-Man

Commentary by Terri Lee Freeman President, National Civil Rights Museum   On Saturday, July 2, 2016, the world lost a survivor, an advocate, a teller of truth, and a believer that ALL human life has merit and purpose. Elie Wiesel was a Holocaust survivor, an author and a Freedom Award recipient in 1995. He worked to ensure that we would never forget the atrocities of the Holocaust and continued to draw attention to the horrors of genocide throughout the world. He... Read More

Love Can Save Us

By Terri Lee Freeman   Museum President The Sunday morning news account of the horrific and tragic slaughter that occurred at the Pulse Nightclub in Orlando, Florida was particularly disturbing to me. For one thing, it brought back memories of two tragic events that I worked through in Washington, DC – September 11 th at the Pentagon and the Naval Yard shooting. In my mind, all I could think about were the families and the trauma they are now facing.   But I... Read More

In Memory of Rev. Samuel "Billy" Kyles

We are deeply saddened by the passing of Rev. Samuel Billy Kyles. Our deepest condolences to the Kyles family. Rev. Kyles was a beloved member of the National Civil Rights Museum family and a lifelong member of the National Civil Rights Museum board of directors. As a lasting tribute, he will be named board member emeritus.   In death, as in life, Rev. Kyles' highly acclaimed story as the last “witness" to Dr. King’s final hours will remain in the The... Read More

Emmett Till 60 years later: the Untold Story

  By Ryan Jones,   Museum Historian   Before Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. spoke of a dream, before Rosa Parks stood up by continuing to sit, before Bloody Sunday, there was a brutal murder in the Mississippi Delta in 1955 that awakened the hearts and minds of an entire generation. The story of Emmett Till is no secret to the Civil Rights Movement. It is even possible now that his story is mentioned in curriculums across the world. But do we really know what... Read More
Posted by Connie Dyson at Friday, August 28, 2015

#Katrina10

  By Terri Lee Freeman   Museum President   Ten years ago, Hurricane Katrina made landfall on the Gulf Coast of Mississippi. It’s considered one of the deadliest hurricanes and most destructive natural disasters in U.S. history. Hundreds of thousands of people along the Gulf Coast, especially in Louisiana, Mississippi and Alabama, were displaced from their homes, and damage is estimated at more than $100 billion. A million people were affected. Close to 2,000... Read More
Posted by Connie Dyson at Friday, August 28, 2015

We’ve Got Work To Do

    By Terri Lee Freeman   Museum President       On Saturday, August 15, 2015 the fight for freedom lost a soldier – Julian Bond. The life of Julian Bond is a message to young and old alike. As a college student, Julian Bond took the role of activist seriously, dropping out of Morehouse College in Atlanta, Georgia to further his involvement with the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC), eventually leading a sit-in at... Read More
Posted by Connie Dyson at Monday, August 17, 2015

MOVING!

  By Terri Lee Freeman, Museum President           Last week, the Museum had the opportunity to play a small role in the home going service for our last living founder, D’Army Bailey. On Friday, July 17, five days following his transition, his body laid-in-state at the National Civil Rights Museum, the institution he fought to ensure came to fruition. On the following Saturday, Judge Bailey was eulogized by former President William... Read More
Posted by Connie Dyson at Wednesday, July 22, 2015

The Crafts of Freedom

  by  Scott Newstok     On April 3, 1968, Martin Luther King Jr. was summoned to the  Bishop Mason Temple  in Memphis to address the  striking sanitation workers  and their supporters. King wasn’t scheduled to speak at the rally, but Reverend Ralph Abernathy, sensing the crowd’s disappointment, had persuaded King to come from the Lorraine Hotel to make a few remarks. Poor pay, unjust working conditions, and two tragic... Read More
Posted by Connie Dyson at Monday, April 6, 2015